Bastien und Bastienne – The Costumes

3 Nov

This one is a real treat! Rococo costumes for kids!

Bastien und Bastienne is an early Mozart opera written by a child (Mozart) for children to perform. It is adorable, and when illustrating it, I decided to cast children as the models and make Rococo costumes for children. A brother and sister portrayed the two characters in my final photo.

Bastien und Bastienne Title, by Tyson Vick.

Bastien und Bastienne Title, by Tyson Vick.

Being one of my early forays into costuming, my mother helped me out with these while she was teaching me to sew, and she actually made the boy’s outfit entirely. I made the girl’s outfit entirely, and did the embroidery on both.

I hope you will check out my mom’s Etsy store Sewing With Twila. She specializes in making things for infants and children.

 

Bastienne

Making a Rococo gown in the style of Marie Antoinette for a little girl was a fun experience. I wanted every costume piece to look cute and pastoral, because the opera is about shepherds, but rococo shepherds, so I wanted it to have that ornate, over-the-top Rococo shepherd feel. The outfits are made out of pink and ivory silk. The ribbon details and flower-embroidery is done with polyester, however.

Rococo gown in the style of Marie Antoinette for a child.

Rococo gown in the style of Marie Antoinette for a child.

I used stiff interfacing instead of boning (or, heaven forbid, nothing) in the bodice. They used to corset children, but I wasn’t playing on that level, then, and I’m still pretty sure I wouldn’t want to corset a child for a photo.

A close up of the details on Bastienne's gown.

A close up of the details on Bastienne’s gown.

I made Ribbon flowers for the bodice using the techniques described in Elegant Ribbonwork by  Helen Gibb. Ribbon flowers were one of my earliest interests, but after some intense work with them, I am physically unable to work on them anymore, as my eyesight always fails when I do. I lose my sight for days after any embroidery work, and I have had to come up with alternate embellishing techniques.

The back of the gown.

The back of the gown.

The gown laces up the back. The costume is actually being worn with an adult size pannier hoop.

Bastienne's hat was made out of a flower basket.

Bastienne’s hat was made out of a flower basket.

I made a little hat out of flower basket for Bastienne. I think it turned out pretty cute.

 

Bastien

The boy’s outfit is matched in every detail to the girl’s. It has the same silk colors, the same ribbon embroidery and reflects the title of the opera “Bastien und Bastienne” which is just the masculine and feminine versions of the same name. Similar to Joseph and Josephina.

The boy's costume, here modeled by Olivia, matches the girl's in every detail.

The boy’s costume, here modeled by Olivia, matches the girl’s in every detail.

My young cousin, Olivia, modeled these two costumes for Etsy when she was 8 years old.

A close up of the details, including ribbon embroidery.

A close up of the details, including ribbon embroidery.

I embroidered up the entire sides of this little coat, and it turned out very prettily.

Back view of boy's rococo outfit.

Back view of boy’s rococo outfit.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this look at my costumes for Bastien und Bastienne!

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One Response to “Bastien und Bastienne – The Costumes”

  1. Roo Bookaroo November 4, 2014 at 9:40 am #

    Both, Bastien and Bastienne, are delightful. Wish a production uses your costumes.

    But what about Colas, the local magician that is solving the problem of reuniting the lovers?
    I hope you don’t turn him into another disguisde devil, as you seemed intent on doing of Weltgeist in “Schuldigkeit”. Colas is a charming, helpful, go-between. Where is Colas, the kingpin of the tale? Colas is a character that is agreeable to the audience, as Weltgeist is attractive and seductive in “Schuldigkeit”, even though John Dew metamorphosed her into a demon from Hell.

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