Tag Archives: Idomeneo

Mozart Reimagined Launch Party

15 Sep

Mozart Reimagined, my beautiful photo book that has taken ten years to complete, is now available for purchase on Kickstarter! For 28 days you will be able to get the book for its lowest price!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/948510266/mozart-reimagined-photography-book-by-tyson-vick

On Sunday we had a launch party for the book! Many of the people who worked on the book came with their friends and family!

Setting up the room.

Setting up the room.

My friend Trevor came to help me set up some costumes and props that I built which were used in the book.

Trevor helps me set up by wearing Neptune's mask from Idomeneo.

Trevor helps me set up by wearing Neptune’s mask from Idomeneo.

 

The party was held at the Rockin’ TJ Ranch, a large event center that usually puts on weddings!

My Der Schauspieldirektor costumes were on display.

My Der Schauspieldirektor costumes were on display.

Many of my costumes from the book were available to view.

My Don Giovanni costume from the cover of the book was on display.

My Don Giovanni costume from the cover of the book was on display.

It was a bit like museum displays!

My Amphitrite gown from my Idomeneo shoot.

My Amphitrite gown from my Idomeneo shoot.

The costumes each had their own pedestal for guests to walk around.

Tamiri's gown from Il Re Pastore.

Tamiri’s gown from Il Re Pastore.

A few props were scattered at the feet of the mannequins.

Ilia's costume from Idomeneo.

Ilia’s costume from Idomeneo.

We had large TVs displaying the photos at the back of the room.

Judith's costume with a severed head on display.

Judith’s costume with a severed head on display.

 

The event planner gave us a full 8 course Rococo feast, the style that would have been put on in Mozart’s day. There was a meat course from every type of game; beef, chicken, fish, ham.

We put on a feast for 55 people.

We put on a feast for 55 people.

Many of the guests were overwhelmed by the sheer amount of food they were being given! Lol.

Mozart Reimagined guests having an 8 course meal.

Mozart Reimagined guests having an 8 course meal.

At the end of the night, we looked at the books together and I signed them.

Here are all the models holding the book open to one single page for our friend who couldn't make it!

Here are all the models holding the book open to one single page for our friend who couldn’t make it!

 

Our book is launched on Kickstarter, but there are only 28 days to get your copy! Help us bring this book to publication!

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Mozart Reimagined Preorders Now Live on Kickstarter!

14 Sep

Hello friends! After ten years, Mozart Reimagined is now available for Pre-Order on Kickstarter!

You can watch some preview videos below, or just click on over to Kickstarter to learn more!

I hope you will all enjoy this labor of love!

If you feel passionately about my project, I would really appreciate it if you would share the Kickstarter link ( https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/948510266/mozart-reimagined-photography-book-by-tyson-vick )on your social media sites (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, etc.!) You can use the hashtags #tysonvickphotography and #mozartreimagined if you like to tag your posts. It would help out immensely. Thank you all for your support over the years! I’m excited to finally be producing the book!

Mozart Reimagined – Idomeneo

19 Aug

Mozart Reimagined by Tyson Vick will feature photos illustrating Mozart’s spectacular opera “Idomeneo”, which features a sea monster. And I love it.

Mozart Reimagined features six photos by Tyson Vick illustrating the opera Idomeneo

Mozart Reimagined features six photos by Tyson Vick illustrating the opera Idomeneo

Mozart Reimagined showcases nearly 100 photos that bring to life Mozart’s operas through photography. I spent a decade building props and sets, meeting models and photographing across the country to showcase what Mozart’s music has meant to me. The book also features essays written about each opera from my own unique perspective. The book humorously points out plot-holes, gives insight into past and present performances, recites a little bit of History and overflows with my own passion for the music of Mozart.

Here’s an excerpt from the book which accompanies the Idomeneo pictures:

“Once the sea monster shows up, melting people with its venomous black tar, it is a constant presence from the finale of act two until the end of the opera. That’s like an hour of watching a sea monster killing people and smashing things while the characters try to get on with their lives. But somebody will have to be sacrificed alive before the sea monster will go away! Who will it be? Will it be Idamante, the heroic-y teenage boy? Will it be Ilia, the songbird Princess of Troy? Will it be Idomeneo, King of Crete, and maker of rash vows? Or will it be Elettra, Princess of crazy, demented ramblings, and will she somehow manage to summon the wrath of hell to consume her world-weary bones? ”

Idomeneo, Act 2 by Tyson Vick

Idomeneo, Act 2 by Tyson Vick

Idomeneo has been one of the most fun parts of this entire book to create. I enjoyed taking the photos and writing the chapter. I met my friend and fellow costumer Catey. I got to work with one of my personal favorite models, Bowen, who you can see above fighting the Sea Monster, and I got to hang out with many old friends for every photo taken for this set. There are a few behind-the-scenes posts here and here.

And you can also get a closer look at many of the costumes like Ilia’s gown, Idamante’s outfit and some goddess stuff here.

This blog also landed me a job costuming the opera “Idomeneo” for the University of Montana last season which is pretty well documented on this blog, too!

I’m going to be giving you a preview of photos from every chapter of Mozart Reimagined over the next month, and then it will be time for pre-orders. I will be launching pre-orders on Kickstarter on September 14th, 2015! Until then, I wanted to give you a glimpse of some of the photos and excerpts from the book so you can see what’s in store! Subscribe to the blog for every update, or check back on September 14th for the launch of the book.

Costuming an Opera, Part 5 – The Rest of the Idomeneo Cast

30 Apr

Numerous tenors populate the cast of Idomeneo, including Arbace, confidant of the King, and the High Priest of Neptune. Catey and I created these costumes continuing with our blue theme.

Idomeneo and Arbace wear costumes by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

Idomeneo and Arbace wear costumes by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

I wanted Arbace to look regal, as he is the King’s confidant. One of the costumes that inspired me was King Joffrey’s wedding garment from A Game of Thrones which features a high collar and prominent sash.

King Joffrey's wedding garment from A Game of Thrones inspired Arbace's costume.

King Joffrey’s wedding garment from A Game of Thrones inspired Arbace’s costume.

We used a blue suede for the coat, which is double breasted.

Arbace's costume under construction.

Arbace’s costume under construction.

The sleeves are curved and have large cuffs. The sash is a sheer textured fabric with a metallic mesh underneath to capture different light effects.

Arbace's costume being made and modeled by actor Miguel.

Arbace’s costume being made and modeled by actor Miguel.

The High Priest also has a blue outfit. He wears a blue robe with very textured cuffs and cowl that drapes over his seashell hat.

Vomited black tar to death, poor dear. In this scene from Idomeneo the High Priest looks over the carnage caused by the seamonster.

Vomited black tar to death, poor dear. In this scene from Idomeneo the High Priest looks over the carnage caused by the seamonster.

This outfit was very successful in my opinion. Each piece looks priestly separately, and together makes a very successful priest costume. The actor, Jess, also has a magnificent posture, which makes him seem just as important as he should — being a High Priest of Neptune.

The creation of the High Priest costume and final fitting with actor Jess.

The creation of the High Priest costume and final fitting with actor Jess.

His cowl is very textured. Texture is the best equipment you can use in stage costumes, I think.

A close up of the priest's cowl.

A close up of the priest’s cowl.

Below you can see Miguel Olivas perform with the dejected chorus at a rehearsal of the opera in full costume as Arbace:

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Costuming an Opera, Part 4 – Idamante from Idomeneo

29 Apr

Somehow I managed to get through this thing without any pictures of Idamante alone.

His costume is a navy blue linen. The actor, Brett, is incredibly tall, and the first time Catey and I made his costume, it was like a mini-skirt. I have pictures of the making of that costume, but that wasn’t the costume he wore as we had to go remake it with a longer hem.

A scene from Idomeneo featuring three of the leads, Idamante, Idomeneo and Elettra. Costumes by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

A scene from Idomeneo featuring three of the leads, Idamante, Idomeneo and Elettra. Costumes by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

Below you can see Idamante’s outfit more clearly… lol. I jokes. That’s just a picture of him nearly getting his head chopped off!

That one dude's gonna kill that other guy.

That one dude’s gonna kill that other guy.

But if you watch the video of Brett performing “Non temer amato bene” you will get to see his costume, fancy belt and cape in action! Check it out below:

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Costuming an Opera, Part 3 – The Princesses of Idomeneo

28 Apr

The opera Idomeneo features many things — many tenors, many sea monster deaths and many princesses. This post consists of two rival princesses, Ilia and Elettra, and the costumes Catey and I made for them in the University of Montana’s production.

Ilia, a Trojan Princess, in the opera Idomeneo. Costume by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

Ilia, a Trojan Princess, in the opera Idomeneo. Costume by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

Ilia wears a beautiful green-blue silk/metal blend. The fabric is the second most expensive fabric in the opera, fitting her station as a princess. I only got one before picture — the one where the fabric was just lying around, so you’ll have to imagine how it was put together!

The fabric before becoming a dress and after becoming a dress on actress Carly as Ilia.

The fabric before becoming a dress and after becoming a dress on actress Carly as Ilia.

The dress was made to be worn three different ways, but during the production it seemed to settle on the one seen in these pictures. The dress is soft and light to reflect the character of the princess, who is the romantic lead of the play.

Ilia tells Idomeneo that he's like a father to her.

Ilia tells Idomeneo that he’s like a father to her.

You can view Ilia’s dress wafting around in the video below:

Elettra, the rival princess, is a visitor to Crete. She is alternately snubbed and ignored by the entirety of the cast, with a few bones thrown her way — mainly by Idomeneo and Ilia. She wants to marry prince Idamante, but generally just gets crazier and crazier. I wanted her to stand apart from the rest of the characters in both color scheme and dress shape. Each time she comes on stage her dress changes a little.

Elettra's dress in its three forms. Costume by Tyson Vick.

Elettra’s dress in its three forms at a fitting. Costume by Tyson Vick.

I did not get any images of the creation of this dress because it took a lot of thought. It has around 13 yards of fabric in it, a gold metallic underskirt with gold netting overlay that flows in a train behind her.

Some images of her moving can be seen below. The effect was very beautiful.

The only pics I could get of Elettra's dress from different angles.

The only pics I could get of Elettra’s dress from different angles.

There is a hoop under her skirt to give some volume to the many gold layers. Watching her rise and fall was very fun.

Elettra in the opera Idomeneo wears a costume by Tyson Vick.

Elettra in the opera Idomeneo wears a costume by Tyson Vick.

Below you can see a video of Elettra’s dress in action:

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Costuming an Opera, Part 2 – Creating Idomeneo

27 Apr

The lead character of the opera “Idomeneo” by Mozart is the King of Crete, Idomeneo. When Catey and I were asked to costume this opera, it was important to give Idomeneo a Kingly look.

Idomeneo laments having to stab his own kid to death.

Idomeneo laments having to stab his own kid to death.

I based my basic concept for the lead costume off of the original costume from the first performance of the opera back when Mozart wrote it:

The original Idomeneo costume.

The original Idomeneo costume.

When Idomeneo first washes up on shore, something that happens to people a lot in this play, I wanted to evoke a wet feel. There wasn’t a large budget for much set design, so I took a very textured gold fabric and overlayed a sheer sparkling blue on top to express coming out of the sea.

The lowest layer of Idomeneo's costume under construction. The textured fabric is covered by a sparkly sheer overlay to evoke wetness.

The lowest layer of Idomeneo’s costume under construction. The textured fabric is covered by a sparkly sheer overlay to evoke wetness.

The costume can be seen on stage below as Idomeneo confronts the specter of the person he has vowed to kill, a specter which haunts him.

The sparkly costume in action on actor Ben as Idomeneo.

The sparkly costume in action on actor Ben as Idomeneo.

When he returns home to his throne, he dons his coat, cape and armor.

The coat is one of the two most expensive fabrics in the opera. I once attended a play of cobbled together costumes where the monarch was wearing polyester (because someone thought it looked shiny, and therefore rich, or something) and the poor people were wearing silk, linen and cotton that had been distressed (so it looked shabby?) I decided to avoid the mistake of costuming the richest person in the cheapest fabric, so here you go, Idomeneo, at $35/yd, this coat is the richest piece in the opera.

The idomeneo fabric. Catey and I lay out pattern pieces to fit.

The idomeneo fabric. Catey and I lay out pattern pieces to fit.

The coat is a standard Rococo cut, like a pirate frock coat. If lifted from the bottom front over the top of the head, it creates a full circle of fabric.

Idomeneo's costume under construction. Catey cuts out the pieces.

Idomeneo’s costume under construction. Catey cuts out the pieces.

Catey and I did not manage to line up all of the diamond pattern at the seams, but what you gonna do?

Pinning together the Idomeneo coat.

Pinning together the Idomeneo coat.

We had to travel a few times to the University to take measurements of the entire cast. I also returned later to try some things on the actors.

Below you can see images from the first and final fittings.

The actor of Idomeneo, Ben, at his first fitting and final fitting.

The actor of Idomeneo, Ben, at his first fitting and final fitting.

We also did not have the budget for real armor, so a costume breastplate was used.

A scene from Idomeneo featuring three of the leads, Idamante, Idomeneo and Elettra. Costumes by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

A scene from Idomeneo featuring three of the leads, Idamante, Idomeneo and Elettra. Costumes by Tyson Vick and Catey Lockhart.

I was quite pleased with the way Idomeneo’s costume looked on stage. It was regal, evoked tradition, and seemed to help the actor, Ben, get into character.

Below you can watch a video from a dress rehearsal of Ben Fox in full costume as Idomeneo!

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